Category Archives: JOL Online Notes

  • Congress is Broken. Fair Districts Could Help Fix It.

    Posted on April 23, 2015 by ldavis in JOL Online Notes.

    The Capitol Building. The bedrock of the first branch of government; home to the World’s Greatest Deliberative Body and the People’s House. Like no other structure, it stands as the very symbol of our system of self-governance.

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  • Why Price Transparency Cannot Cure American Healthcare

    Posted on January 30, 2015 by harvardjol in JOL Online Notes.

    by Jonathan Klein, JD16 “Price transparency” is a buzz-phrase one tends to hear a lot in discussions over healthcare reform. Price transparency laws, which require covered health care providers to disclose to consumers cost estimates for health care services, are attractive to lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, and it’s easy to see why. […]

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  • Saving the Affordable Care Act if the King v. Burwell Challenge Succeeds

    Posted on January 8, 2015 by harvardjol in JOL Online Notes.

    In this essay, I will assume that it is the day after the Supreme Court’s decision in the upcoming case of King v. Burwell, the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act, and will further assume that the Supreme Court has found for the plaintiffs in a decision roughly along the lines of that handed down by the DC Circuit panel in Halbig v. Burwell. I will propose and discuss a method that the Obama Administration could use to ensure that the ACA continues to function as intended even after such a ruling, or that the Obama Administration could implement in advance of such a ruling as a means of rendering the King challenge substantively moot. Those familiar with King may wish to skip the “Background” section of this essay, and move directly to the section entitled “Goals and Constraints”.

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  • Recap of JOL Midterm Election Panel

    Posted on November 23, 2014 by harvardjol in JOL Online Notes.

    On Monday, November 10, the Journal on Legislation hosted Professor Steve Ansolabehere (a Harvard government professor who consulted this year with CBS News on its election night coverage specializes in electoral politics, public opinion, and media) and Professor Elaine Kamarck (a Kennedy School professor and former White House senior staffer who created the National Performance […]

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  • Competitive Ideas for Reducing Healthcare Costs

    Posted on November 20, 2014 by harvardjol in JOL Online Notes.

    Jeremy Salinger, Class of 2017 I. Introduction Nino Monea, Class of 2017, recently proposed that making price information for medical care available to consumers online would increase the transparency in healthcare shopping, which in turn would lead to greater competition among healthcare providers and lower costs to consumers. Mr. Monea’s analysis focused on the relationship […]

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  • JOL Co-Hosts Election Night Party at HLS

    Posted on November 10, 2014 by harvardjol in JOL Online Notes.

    On this past Election Day, November 4th, hundreds of members of the Harvard Community attended the HLS Election Day party and issue discussion. The event hosted by the Journal on Legislation, Harvard Law School Democrats, and Harvard Law Republicans obtained overwhelming bipartisan support and attendance. The event commenced with a key announcement early in the […]

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  • Sen. Snowe Speak with Dean Minow About Why Congress Isn’t Working

    Posted on October 31, 2014 by harvardjol in JOL Online Notes.

    On October 30, Harvard Law School’s Dean Minow hosted Senator Olympia Snowe and Jason Grumet, Director of Bipartisan Policy Center. Held just a few days before the Mid-term elections, the talk focused on bipartisanship in Congress and why it isn’t working. The talk opened up with a video on the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Commission on […]

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  • Former RNC Chairman Bemoans the Demise of Bipartisanship

    Posted on October 31, 2014 by harvardjol in JOL Online Notes.

    On Monday, October 27, Former RNC Chairman Frank Fahrenkopf came to Harvard Law School to discuss bipartisanship in Congress over the course of the past three decades: “Back in the 80s, a very partisan time, things got done. Washington for the last eight or nine years? Nothing get’s done…and there are some interesting reasons why.”

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  • A Clear Solution for Health Care Costs

    Posted on October 30, 2014 by harvardjol in Featured Items, JOL Online Notes.

    by Nino Monea, Class of 2017 The market for health care is an economist’s nightmare. Many of the market forces that would militate against rising prices in other industries simply do not exist for the health care market in the United States. Sudden injuries and illnesses create demand uncertainty by preventing consumers from planning in […]

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  • Liar, Liar…Possible Changes Ahead for Lie Detection Legislation

    Posted on August 11, 2014 by harvardjol in Featured Items, JOL Online Notes.

    By Jenna Tynan, Class of 2016 Most of us experience the distinct pleasure of completing a job application at some point in our lives. One can expect standard questions including name, address, and employment history. Depending on the state, employers may or may not ask questions related to an applicant’s gender orientation, marital status, or […]

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