Category Archives: JOL Online Notes

  • Be Warned: A Proposal to Reform Food Product Disclosure Statements

    Posted on October 14, 2018 by Louis Murray in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Be Warned: A Proposal to Reform Food Product Disclosure Statements By Gideon Zvi Palte, J.D. ’18[*]   I. Introduction Dietary choices can have a significant effect on health.[1] Moderate reduction in salt consumption can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and coronary heart attack.[2] High cholesterol has been identified as a major contributor to […]

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  • It is All About the Money: Presidential Conflicts of Interest

    Posted on March 25, 2018 by Justin Kenney in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    It is All About the Money: Presidential Conflicts of Interest By Samantha Block[*] The 2016 presidential election marked an increased distrust in the government, bringing a new era of presidential and vice presidential candidates. Current conflict of interest laws do not extend to the President and Vice President due to an outdated fear of interfering […]

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  • Don’t Hold Your Breath: Furthering the Fight Against Drunken Driving Until Autonomous Vehicles Arrive

    Posted on November 11, 2017 by Winston Shi in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Don’t Hold Your Breath: Furthering the Fight Against Drunken Driving Until Autonomous Vehicles Arrive By Russell Spivak, JD ’17[*] Interlocking Ignition Devices (IIDs) restrict a driver from turning on a car unless he or she passes a Breathalyzer examination. There is significant reason to think that promoting—if not mandating—the installation of such technologies in all […]

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  • Participation in Name Only: How Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act Can Present a Meaningful Challenge to Big Money in Politics

    Posted on September 28, 2017 by Justin Kenney in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Participation in Name Only: How Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act Can Present a Meaningful Challenge to Big Money in Politics By Jonathan Topaz, JD ’18[*] “No, Jim Crow is not dead. It’s not quite dead. It now focuses its energy in different areas. Instead of literacy tests or poll taxes, the new way […]

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  • Churches are not Places of Public Accommodation

    Posted on November 28, 2016 by P K in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Churches are not Places of Public Accommodation [*] By Caleb C. Wolanek, JD ’17 [**] On September 1, the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination stated that churches would be subject to the Commonwealth’s “public accommodation” statute.[1] Although Attorney General Maura Healey some time ago slipped “houses of worship” onto her website’s list of places of public […]

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  • G.I. Jane and the Selective Service: Equal Protection Challenges to Male-Only Selective Service in the Modern Military

    Posted on August 5, 2016 by P K in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    G.I. Jane and the Selective Service: Equal Protection Challenges to Male-Only Selective Service in the Modern Military[*] By Russell Spivak, JD ‘17 & Lieutenant Adam Aliano, USN, JD ‘17 [*] This article in no way reflects the views of the Department of Defense. In 1981, the Supreme Court approved a requirement that men alone register with the […]

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  • Labeling GM Foods: Democracy and Autonomy

    Posted on February 21, 2016 by ldavis in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Labeling GM Foods: Democracy and Autonomy by Alex G. Leone, JD ’16  I. Introduction A bipartisan majority of Americans asserts a right to know what it is eating and wants mandatory labeling of genetically modified (“GM”) foods:[1] a simple, on-label statement of whether a food or food ingredient is the product of genetic engineering.[2] A […]

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  • Faithfully Executed? The Legal and Rational Imperative of Declining to Seek the Federal Death Penalty in Abolitionist States

    Posted on January 6, 2016 by ldavis in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Faithfully Executed? The Legal and Rational Imperative of Declining to Seek the Federal Death Penalty in Abolitionist States by Francesca Procaccini, JD ’15 I. Introduction Prosecutorial discretion bestows both a power and a duty—it confers control, and demands restraint. In the federal system, this discretion derives from the prosecutor’s role as an Executive officer, charged […]

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  • Physician Self-Referral: Back on the Agenda or Out for Good?

    Posted on November 9, 2015 by ldavis in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Physician Self-Referral: Back on the Agenda or Out for Good? by Amanda Bakowski JD ’17 I. Introduction On June 25, 2015, the Supreme Court decided King v. Burwell, holding that the tax credits established by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) are available to individuals purchasing health insurance on exchanges created by the federal […]

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  • Prosecutorial Discretion and the Expansion of Executive Power: An Analysis of the Holder Memorandum

    Posted on October 15, 2015 by ldavis in JOL Online, JOL Online Notes.

    Prosecutorial Discretion and the Expansion of Executive Power: An Analysis of the Holder Memorandum by Erin Cady, JD ’16    I. Introduction President Obama has used executive power to advance policymaking on issues from immigration to national security throughout his Administration, particularly since the Republican Party won a majority of seats in the House of Representatives […]

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